Water and fire imagery in emily brontes novel jane eyre

Critics such as Adrienne Rich and Eric Solomon argue that Jane Eyre has to choose between the "temptation" of following the rule of passion by marrying Rochester, or of living a life of complete renunciation of all passions by marrying St. Fire and water imagery symbolizes these two forces competing for dominance in Jane Eyre, both on a personal and metaphorical level. In Jane Eyre, fire imagery has a strong metaphorical significance, representing passion, sexual desire and the heat of emotion and feeling. Water, the antithesis of fire, represents the extreme point of cool reason, without any trace of passion.

Water and fire imagery in emily brontes novel jane eyre

The cold and wet window is juxtaposed with the fiery red of the curtains and sets up the underlying theme of fire and water, which runs all the way through the novel. Going further than Solomon, fire and water are the two sides of the character of Jane, and they strengthen and weaken in Jane depending on location and the characters around her.

Fire and water imagery symbolizes the two forces competing for dominance in Jane Eyre, both on a personal and metaphorical level. Throughout the novel, such imagery is used by Brontë, in keeping with her use of much poetic symbolism, to develop character, strengthen thematic detail and establish mood. Imagery in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre Essay Words | 5 Pages. Imagery in Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte wrote the novel Jane Eyre in the mid-eighteen hundreds. In her novel she expresses her views on many important factors present during this time including social problems such as race, class, gender, and the role of religion. Get an answer for 'In Bronte's Jane Eyre, examine the use of imagery and symbolism in the depiction of central themes in the novel. ' and find homework help for other Jane Eyre questions at eNotes.

She is an absorbent personality, who is influenced by these dominant tropes that lie within certain characters of the novel — but she is never fully controlled by any of them. It is this duality within her that allows her to escape both extremes, the fiery Edward Rochester and the ice-cold St.

These images of fire and water represent the five different locations within the novel, the different characters and their personalities, and are objects used to set mood as well as symbolize religious and psychological depths within the novel.

White 2 Because the novel is setup as an autobiography told in past tense, the narrator is able to look back on her journey and use certain tropes to express emotions and abstract ideas that carry throughout the entire novel.

Two major opposing objects in Jane Eyre is the use of fire and water. Tillyard explains the Elizabethan concept of the four elements and their relation to each other.

Jane Eyre - Wikipedia

Fire has the qualities of hot and dry, while water has the qualities of cold and moist. Rochester is the element of fire and passion, and St.

Fire is a symbol of emotion in the novel. Mr. Rochester has a fiery personality, while St. John is associated with ice and snow, symbolizing his dispassionate character. The episode involving the fire in Chapter 15 of Charlotte Brontë’s novel Jane Eyre is significant for a number of reasons, including those already mentioned in the answer above. However, the. Fire and Heat Imagery in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre The essence of any true magnificent piece of literature is not what one can see in words. It is what one can see behind the words. It is through the symbolism and imagery found in works of literature that a reader can truly connect with the writer.

John Rivers is the element of water — namely ice — and is pure reason, logic, and religion. It is Jane that holds the key to these opposing elements. In containing both of these elements within herself, she is the most dynamic character and, thus, a true heroine.

By reading the novel with the intention of noting the uses of fire and water in their different formats — such as, fireplaces, candles, open flames, rain, rivers, wash bowls, and ice — and also paying attention to the symbolic quality to these elements, certain trends begin to arise.

The above graph reveals that, in most locations, one element has a stronger association with each place, and, interestingly, Thornfield Hall has the most extreme contrast.

Not what you're looking for? Plot[ edit ] Jane Eyre is divided into 38 chapters.
Related Questions During their brief encounters, she notices his moodiness, but it doesn't upset her.

It is at Thornfield that passion and fire reign supreme. This motif is also most referenced at Thornfield even though Jane spent the least amount of time at this location; still, it is the White 4 central location of her autobiography and is the location where emotions were strongest. Reed, who is forced to provide for the orphaned Jane.

During the time of her narration, Jane resides there during the fall and early winter, and the weather is cold, wet, and dreary. Being loathed by Mrs. Reed and her children, Jane is an outsider in this hostile home and is a victim of the abusive son, John Reed.

Smith 77 As a passionate outcast exemplifying fire, Jane is juxtaposed against the coldness of the Reed family and their staff — with the exception of the maid, Bessie. Jane comes to physical blows with John Reed and is punished by being locked up in the red-room.

The red-room is described in great detail with the contrast details of white: A bed supported on massive pillars of mahogany, hung with curtains of deep red damask, stood out like a tabernacle in the centre; the two large windows, with their blinds always drawn down, was half shrouded in festoons and falls of similar drapery; the carpet was red; the table at the foot of the bed was covered with a crimson cloth; the walls were a soft fawn colour with a blush of pink tint; the wardrobe, the toilet-table, the White 5 chairs were of darkly polished old mahogany.

Out of these deep surrounding shades rose high, and glared white, the piled-up mattresses and pillows of the bed, spread with a snowy Marseilles counterpane. Scarcely less prominent was an ample cushioned easy-chair near the head of the bed, also white, with a footstool before it; and looking, as I thought, like a pale throne.

Using a Gothic trope, Jane mentions Mr. Reed had died in this room and is said to haunt the place.Fire is a symbol of emotion in the novel.

Mr.

How does Jane save Rochester from the fire?

Rochester has a fiery personality, while St. John is associated with ice and snow, symbolizing his dispassionate character.

Water and fire imagery in emily brontes novel jane eyre

No cozy, s'mores-toasting fires here. Nope. These fires are sexy and murderous. The most important fires in Jane Eyre are Bertha’s two acts of arson: the first at the end of Volume 1 (Chapter 15), when Bertha sets fire to Rochester’s bedclothes, and the second at the end of Volume 3 (Chapter Fire and water imagery symbolizes the two forces competing for dominance in Jane Eyre, both on a personal and metaphorical level.

Throughout the novel, such imagery is used by Brontë, in keeping with her use of much poetic symbolism, to develop character, strengthen thematic detail . Get an answer for 'In Bronte's Jane Eyre, examine the use of imagery and symbolism in the depiction of central themes in the novel.

' and find homework help for other Jane Eyre questions at eNotes.

Discuss the use of symbolism in Jane Eyre. | eNotes

Fire and water imagery symbolizes the two forces competing for dominance in Jane Eyre, both on a personal and metaphorical level. Throughout the novel, such imagery is used by Brontë, in keeping with her use of much poetic symbolism, to develop character, strengthen thematic detail and establish mood.

Fire and water symbolism symbolizes these two strengths going after predominance in Jane Eyre, both on an individual and figurative level.

All through the novel, this symbolism of flame and water is utilized by Bront, in keeping with her utilization of idyllic imagery, to create character, fortify topical detail, and secure state of mind.

Emily Brontë - Wikipedia