Alexander the great in conquest of gaugemel

It took over one hundred triremes boats with oars to transport the entire Macedonian army, but the Persians decided to ignore the movement. Memnon of Rhodesthe Greek mercenary who aligned himself with the Persians, advocated a scorched earth strategy. He wanted the Persians to destroy the land in front of Alexander, which he hoped would force Alexander's army to starve, and then to turn back.

Alexander the great in conquest of gaugemel

It took over one hundred triremes boats with oars to transport the entire Macedonian army, but the Persians decided to ignore the movement. Memnon of Rhodesthe Greek mercenary who aligned himself with the Persians, advocated a scorched earth strategy.

Eventually, with Alexander advancing deeper into Persian territory, Darius put Memnon in control of an army, and told him to finally confront Alexander.

After crossing the HellespontAlexander advanced up the road to the Alexander the great in conquest of gaugemel of the Satrapy of Phrygia. The various satraps of the Persian empire gathered with their forces at the town of Zelea and offered battle on the banks of the Granicus River.

Alexander ultimately fought many of his battles on a river bank. By doing so, he was able to minimize the advantage the Persians had in numbers.

In addition, the deadly Persian chariots were useless on a cramped, muddy river bank. The Persians placed their cavalry in front of their infantry, and drew up on the right east bank of the river. The Macedonian line was arrayed with the heavy Phalanxes in the middle, and cavalry on either side.

According to Diodorusthe Alexander sculptures by Lysippus were the most faithful. This tactic caught the Persians off guard. The battle started with a cavalry and light infantry attack from the Macedonian left, so the Persians heavily reinforced that side.

However, by this point, Alexander led the horse companions in their classic wedge-shaped charge, and smashed into the center of the Persian line. Several high-ranking Persian nobles were killed by Alexander himself or his bodyguards, although Alexander was stunned by an axe-blow from a Persian nobleman named Spithridates.

Before the noble could deal a death-blow, however, he was himself killed by Cleitus the Black. The Macedonian cavalry opened a hole in the Persian line, and the Macedonian infantry charged through to engage the poor quality Persian infantry in the rear. At this, and with many of their leaders already dead, both flanks of the Persian cavalry retreated, and the infantry was cut down as it fled.

As he moved deeper into Persia, however, the threat of trouble seemed to grow. Many of these towns had been ruled for generations by heavy handed tyrants, so in these Persian towns, he did the opposite of what he did in Greece.

Wanting to appear to be a liberator, he freed the population and allowed self-government. As he continued marching into Persia, he saw that his victory at Granicus had been lost on no one. Town after town seemed to surrender to him. The satrap at Sardisas well as his garrison, was among the first of many satraps to capitulate.

There appeared to be little change from the old system. Alexander, however, appointed independent boards to collect tribute and taxes from the satrapies, which appeared to do nothing more than improve the efficiency of government.

The true effect, however, was to separate the civil from the financial function of these satrapies, thus ensuring that these governments, while technically independent of him, never truly were. Otherwise, he allowed the inhabitants of these towns to continue as they always had, and made no attempt to impose Greek customs on them.

Alexander granted their wish, and allowed them to stop paying taxes to Persia, but only if they joined the League of Corinth. By doing so, they promised to provide monetary support to Alexander. Alexander, who had a weak navy, was constantly being threatened by the Persian navy.

It continuously attempted to provoke an engagement with Alexander, who would have none of it. Eventually, the Persian fleet sailed to Halicarnassusin order to establish a new defense.

Ada of Cariathe former queen of Halicarnassus, had been driven from her throne by her usurping brother.

Alexander the great in conquest of gaugemel

When he died, Darius had appointed Orontobates satrap of Caria, which included Halicarnassus in its jurisdiction. On the approach of Alexander in BC, Ada, who was in possession of the fortress of Alindasurrendered the fortress to him. Alexander and Ada appear to have formed an emotional connection.

He called her "mother", finding her more amicable than his megalomaniacal snake-worshiping mother Olympias. In return for his support, Ada gave Alexander gifts, and even sent him some of the best cooks in Asia Minor, realizing that Alexander had a sweet tooth.

In the past, Alexander had referred to his biological father, Philip, as his "so-called" father, and preferred to think of the deity Amon Zeus as his actual father. Thus, he had finally managed to divorce himself from both of his biological parents.

Alexander had sent spies to meet with dissidents inside the city, who had promised to open the gates and allow Alexander to enter.The Battle of Gaugamela (1st October BCE, also known as the Battle of Arbela) was the final meeting between Alexander the Great of Macedon and King Darius III of Persia.

After this victory, Alexander was, without question, the King of all Asia. The Battle of Gaugamela took place in BC. This was the decisive battle of the conquest of Alexander the Great's.

The Conquest of the Persian Empire | The Macedonian Conquest of Persia

This battle eventually led to the fall of the Persian Achaemenid Empire. Before the battle, the Persian leader, Darius, tried to find a diplomatic way to end Alexander the Great's conquest into Persia. Alexander did not want Darius to have excuses for not winning and so wanted a clear cut battle.

In the night, it was more dangerous and Alexander was less aware of the terrain surrounding the enemy rutadeltambor.comonally, Darius .

Battle of Gaugamela, also called Battle of Arbela, (Oct. 1, bc) battle in which Alexander the Great completed his conquest of Darius III’s Persian Empire. It was an extraordinary victory achieved against a numerically superior army on ground chosen by the Persians.

The Battle of Gaugamela (1st October BCE, also known as the Battle of Arbela) was the final meeting between Alexander the Great of Macedon and King Darius III of Persia.

Alexander the great in conquest of gaugemel

After this victory, Alexander was, without question, the King of all Asia. The Conquest of the Persian Empire Alexander the Great had three major battles against the Persian Empire, those three battles were the battle of Granicus, the battle of Issus, and lastly the battle of Gaugamela.

Alexander Defeats The Persians, BC