A chapter analysis of charlotte brontes jane eyre

Fairfax that he may go to Europe for a year.

A chapter analysis of charlotte brontes jane eyre

The next day commenced as before, getting up and dressing by rushlight; but this morning we were obliged to dispense with the ceremony of washing; the water in the pitchers was frozen.

A change had taken place in the weather the preceding evening, and a keen north-east wind, whistling through the crevices of our bedroom windows all night long, had made us shiver in our beds, and turned the contents of the ewers to ice. Before the long hour and a half of prayers and Bible-reading was over, I felt ready to perish with cold.

A chapter analysis of charlotte brontes jane eyre

Breakfast-time came at last, and this morning the porridge was not burnt; the quality was eatable, the quantity small. How small my portion seemed! I wished it had been doubled. In the course of the day I was enrolled a member of the fourth class, and regular tasks and occupations were assigned me: It was English history: Even in that obscure position, Miss Scatcherd continued to make her an object of constant notice: A chapter having been read through twice, the books were closed and the girls examined.

The lesson had comprised part of the reign of Charles I. I kept expecting that Miss Scatcherd would praise her attention; but, instead of that, she suddenly cried out - "You dirty, disagreeable girl! I wondered at her silence. When I returned to my seat, that lady was just delivering an order of which I did not catch the import; but Burns immediately left the class, and going into the small inner room where the books were kept, returned in half a minute, carrying in her hand a bundle of twigs tied together at one end.

This ominous tool she presented to Miss Scatcherd with a respectful curtesy; then she quietly, and without being told, unloosed her pinafore, and the teacher instantly and sharply inflicted on her neck a dozen strokes with the bunch of twigs.

I looked at her narrowly as she emerged from the book-closet; she was just putting back her handkerchief into her pocket, and the trace of a tear glistened on her thin cheek. The play-hour in the evening I thought the pleasantest fraction of the day at Lowood: On the evening of the day on which I had seen Miss Scatcherd flog her pupil, Burns, I wandered as usual among the forms and tables and laughing groups without a companion, yet not feeling lonely: Probably, if I had lately left a good home and kind parents, this would have been the hour when I should most keenly have regretted the separation; that wind would then have saddened my heart; this obscure chaos would have disturbed my peace!

Jumping over forms, and creeping under tables, I made my way to one of the fire-places; there, kneeling by the high wire fender, I found Burns, absorbed, silent, abstracted from all round her by the companionship of a book, which she read by the dim glare of the embers.

I was glad of this. I was sent to Lowood to get an education; and it would be of no use going away until I have attained that object. If she struck me with that rod, I should get it from her hand; I should break it under her nose.

Brocklehurst would expel you from the school; that would be a great grief to your relations. It is far better to endure patiently a smart which nobody feels but yourself, than to commit a hasty action whose evil consequences will extend to all connected with you; and besides, the Bible bids us return good for evil.

I am far younger than you, and I could not bear it. I could not comprehend this doctrine of endurance; and still less could I understand or sympathise with the forbearance she expressed for her chastiser. Still I felt that Helen Burns considered things by a light invisible to my eyes.

I suspected she might be right and I wrong; but I would not ponder the matter deeply; like Felix, I put it off to a more convenient season.

A chapter analysis of charlotte brontes jane eyre

To me you seem very good. I am, as Miss Scatcherd said, slatternly; I seldom put, and never keep, things, in order; I am careless; I forget rules; I read when I should learn my lessons; I have no method; and sometimes I say, like you, I cannot BEAR to be subjected to systematic arrangements. This is all very provoking to Miss Scatcherd, who is naturally neat, punctual, and particular.

One strong proof of my wretchedly defective nature is, that even her expostulations, so mild, so rational, have not influence to cure me of my faults; and even her praise, though I value it most highly, cannot stimulate me to continued care and foresight.

I observed you in your class this morning, and saw you were closely attentive: Now, mine continually rove away; when I should be listening to Miss Scatcherd, and collecting all she says with assiduity, often I lose the very sound of her voice; I fall into a sort of dream.

Sometimes I think I am in Northumberland, and that the noises I hear round me are the bubbling of a little brook which runs through Deepden, near our house;--then, when it comes to my turn to reply, I have to be awakened; and having heard nothing of what was read for listening to the visionary brook, I have no answer ready.

This afternoon, instead of dreaming of Deepden, I was wondering how a man who wished to do right could act so unjustly and unwisely as Charles the First sometimes did; and I thought what a pity it was that, with his integrity and conscientiousness, he could see no farther than the prerogatives of the crown.

If he had but been able to look to a distance, and see how what they call the spirit of the age was tending!LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in Jane Eyre, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work.

Charlotte Brontë World Literature Analysis - Essay - rutadeltambor.com

Fyfe, Paul. "Jane Eyre Chapter " LitCharts. LitCharts LLC, 22 Jul Web. 16 Nov Fyfe, Paul. "Jane Eyre Chapter " LitCharts. LitCharts LLC, 22 Jul Web. This lesson provides an overview of the third chapter of Charlotte Bronte's ''Jane Eyre.'' We will learn how far-reaching the consequences of the.

From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes Jane Eyre Study Guide has everything you need to ace quizzes, tests, and essays.

How does Jane save Rochester from the fire?

Welcome to the new SparkNotes! Jane Eyre is a novel by Charlotte Bront. Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre has several important themes. One of the most important themes may be the injustice of a rigid class structure.

Because Jane is an orphan, her life choices are far. Literature Network» Charlotte Bronte» Jane Eyre» Chapter 6. Chapter 6 CHAPTER VI.

The next day commenced as before, getting up and dressing by rushlight; but this morning we were obliged to dispense with the ceremony of washing; the water in the pitchers was frozen. A change. The Reconciliation of Fire, Ice, and Eyre. In the novel Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte explores a patriarchal Victorian society, where Nature clashes with monotheist Christianity, and passion clashes with reason.

As Jane develops, conflicted with these polarized binaries, Bronte examines the dichotomy between the fire of passion and emotion and the ice of spirituality and rationality.

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte- Literary Analysis – Moosmosis